QUESTIONS TO BE ADDRESSED BY PRESENTERS:

1) What are you researching?

2) Why are you researching this topic?

3) How are you researching this topic?

4) What is the status of your research?



1) State the nature of the issue, topic or problem that you are studying. Include at least 1-2 questions your research addresses and, if possible, state your formal hypotheses (tentative assumptions you are testing through your research).

Purpose
Objective
Issue
Research question
Problem
Hypothesis
Thesis
Major points
Premises


2) Briefly explain what is known about the issue, topic or problem (background). Also explain why you are researching it. For example, why is it important? Why does it interest you? What new information can you add with your research?

Justification
Rationale
Motivation
Significance
Background


3) Describe what you are doing and materials you are using, e.g., lab experiments designed or conducted, interviews, surveys, library research/literature review, subjects/ populations studied, conditions examined, etc. Also note theories used, developed or demonstrated. (Address what applies to research in your field.)

Methods
Methodology
Design
Study population
Research Subjects


4) Describe the status of your project, e.g., your initial observations (if any) and future directions; or describe your results and your conclusions (e.g., supporting or not supporting your hypothesis). What problems have you encountered? What have you learned? What do you hope to learn?

Current status
Progress toward results
Results
Discussion (interpretation of results)
Conclusions
Limitations of research
Implications




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ADVANCED QUESTIONS: Presentations for research beyond the initial stage should include most, if not all, of the following:

Statement of the problem or issue
Brief background or literature review (what is already known about the problem?)
Hypotheses (what you want to test or what you think you will find). Include one to three research questions.
Methods (what you did or plan to do)
Results (what you found or think you will find)
Discussion (what the results might mean)
Significance (why is what you are testing important and what new information can it add?)
Limitations of research
Future research directions

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2005 CIC/SROP Conference
Research Roundtable Presentation Guidelines For CIC/SROP Scholars
Committee on Institutional Cooperation
Summer Research Opportunities Program Conference
University of Wisconsin-Madison
July 15-17, 2005
University of Wisconson Website




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